The lens perspective

Image of Telephoto Lens

Introduction

Article that defines and expands the “through the lens” technique that has been outlined in a previous post.

Description

A good description of the through the lens technique would be the adaptation of the focal elements of a camera lens to the writing of a manuscript.

The wide–angle type lens—with its narrow field of view—produces an image with distorted edges and deceptive perspective; objects on either side appear to bend even if they are straight and background objects appear to be set further in the distance than they really are.

The portrait type lens—with its wide field of view—produces an image with less edge distortion and truer perspective; if objets on either side are straight they will appear plumb and background objects will appear closer to the foreground.

I employ the wide–angle focal image to visualize rough elements of a story—the narrow field of view produces a wider image that represents the foundation of the story.

The portrait focal image is used to refine the foundation elements—the wider field of view produces a narrower image that represents the final product.

Expansion

I’ve decided to adapt the through the lens technique to the actual story based on narrative styles.

First person narrative will make extensive use of the wide–angle image—the mindset of the character will determine the level of lens distortion—the thoughts and feelings of the character will be shared with the story line.

Third person narrative will make extensive use of the portrait lens image—the story will be told as if were being photographed—the thoughts and feelings of the characters will be shared with the story line through dialogue

Conclusion

This is the technique that will be employed throughout the entire series of short stories that will be developed for publishing.

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Author: Mark Philipson

Using WordPress tools to categorize, organize and deploy ideas related to future projects.

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